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The notebook of......

Anne Marie Le Roux Stellenbosch

A faculty member at University of Stellenbosch Business School Executive Development (USB-ED), Anne Marie le roux was in Mauritius recently in the context of the management development programmes USB-ED offers in partnership with Global Natives.

Jean-Michel Nairac

A few weeks ago, myself and a few of my streetwise work colleagues were invited to attend a presentation by a European-based company pitching about a software product derived from artificial intelligence (AI). From a sales point of view it ticks all the boxes. The company is highly innovative, it has an impressive client base, it is run by reputable businessmen, the brain power behind the software is exceptional and it even has its own Wikipedia page.

Dharmen Dhaliah

Les entreprises sont-elles pleinement conscientes de l’importance de planifier la gestion de leurs actifs matériels ? Développent-elles une approche tactique face à cette problématique ou sont-elles beaucoup plus dans l’improvisation ? Dharmen Dhaliah, «Certified   Assessor», apporte des éléments de réponse.

Hemrish Aubeelack

Like every Mauritian living abroad, I take pride in every mention of Mauritius in the international press and I get ever so slightly emotional when someone who has been on holiday in Mauritius tells me how beautiful it is and how kind its people has been to them. There is no doubt that us Mauritians are kind people indeed, forever welcoming. However I cannot help but remember every time my loved ones in Mauritius told me of their bad experience with customer service, or how rude someone was towards them.

Enjeux RH

Cet article s’inscrit dans le prolongement du débat organisé par le HEC Indian Ocean Human Resources Club pour ses membres. Au cours d’un atelier consacré aux enjeux HR à Maurice, quatre CEO ont partagé leurs points de vue : Caroline Rault (Maurilait), Yann Duchesne (IBL), Nicolas Maigrot (Terra) et Bertrand Casteres (Mauritius Union).

Vikas Sharma PwC Mauritius

A few years back, cybersecurity was something that did not get a lot of attention from boards. Today, when scanning headlines and news about the latest high-profile cyberattacks, your blood pressure elevates as you wonder: could that happen to us? What would be the impact on our business? How would we respond to customers and shareholders? With such high stakes, most of us would agree that cybersecurity deserves full attention from the highest levels of an organisation.

flash-back

Il y a 25 ans, une petite équipe de journalistes chevronnés prenait le pari de faire un magazine économique. Au fil des années, les effectifs se sont constamment renouvelés. Certains d’eux ont bien voulu se confier. Petit voyage dans le temps.

Tony Lingiah

I was interested in the reaction of  L’express readers to Jean Paul Arouff interesting article entitled “Fuite de cerveaux” as a follow-up to Mugabe’s speech at the African forum.

Amélie Audibert

Les stéréotypes nous mènent la vie dure. Croyez-le, les femmes qui atteignent les postes à haut niveau de responsabilité ne sont pas toutes des guerrières ‘amazones’ qui doivent obligatoirement évoluer dans un environnement de compétition fortement ‘masculinisé’. Et les hommes ne sont pas tous des ‘machos’ qui se font un devoir d’accueillir des femmes aux postes décisionnaires pour répondre au besoin des ‘quotas’.

Ken Arian

Le secteur des Tic ou plutôt le secteur de l’information et du numérique a connu un développement fulgurant à partir des années 2000 et compte 750 entreprises avec pas moins de 23 000 emplois directs après une dizaine d’années, selon le Board of Investment.

Ramesh Basant Roi

Ever since the dual licensing regime was done away with in the new Bank of Mauritius Act 2004, our financial sector has thrived impressively. To ensure its viability and sustained expansion, it is imperative to take a long-term strategic view for the financial sector.  It is universally agreed that the challenges are many, the risks and vulnerabilities are many, the uncertainties are many but the window of new opportunities is narrow – extremely narrow indeed. As a small and highly open economy opera-ting in a globalised world of finance, Mauritius faces various challenges. The two overriding challenges are how best to address the risks and vulnerabilities associated with the offshore business sector and how best to maintain the competitive advantage of the financial sector as a whole.

Gilles Huberson

Sur le plan économique, la France figure parmi les premiers investisseurs à Maurice, avec des investissements directs étrangers qui représentent près du tiers des montants investis. De grands groupes français comme Orange, Canal+, Total, Colas, BPCE, Accor ou Casino, des entreprises de taille intermédiaire et des petites et moyennes entreprises, ainsi que de nombreux entrepreneurs individuels, apportent leur contribution à l’économie mauricienne en investissant et en créant des emplois (13 000 salariés sont employés par les investisseurs français à Maurice en 2016), dont une part importante provient de La Réunion.

Arnaud Dalais

Business Mauritius recently launched its corporate identity, as well as its new strategic orientation, for the 1,000+ member companies and other stakeholders to better understand what the association wants to achieve. Business Mauritius’ mission is to help in “Building our future”, because the whole country will progress with the further development of our business sector. In order to fully participate in the national effort for a better Mauritius, it was therefore essential to agree on a new strategic orientation to optimally sustain the progress of business.

Kee Chong Li Kwong Wing

Under the spotlight

Our financial services sector has had its fair share of criticism in the international press recently. Even the official press release from the Ministry of Finance of India following the renegotiation of the India-Mauritius Double Taxation Treaty candidly asserted that ‘The Protocol will tackle the long pending issues of treaty abuse and round tripping of funds attributed to the India-Mauritius treaty’. This added to the list of accusations levelled against our jurisdiction by Swissleaks, Panama Papers, International Consortium of Investigative Journalists, and even by some ignorant local political pundits, branding Mauritius as an opaque fiscal paradise where a lucrative business was being supposedly made with black money. All this was not helped by the former Prime Minister seen on TV with heaps of newly issued hard currency notes in his coffers seized at his home.

Afsar Ebrahim

We are sailing towards 50 years of independence and looking back, we have grown into adulthood with a matter of pride. We have evolved from a monocrop economy to an international financial services centre of substance and repute. Our democratic system, legal framework, education have contributed to this result. The vision and commitment of our political leaders and the entrepreneurial culture of the private sector have led this transformation seamlessly.However, the future (next five years) will see a degree of disruption in business that we have never experienced. The disruption risk is causing many sleepless nights to business leaders who are alert to this risk. The globalization as we have known is gradually fading, the political scene is changing with emerging disruption in democratic society. It seems there is a new political agenda with more inwardly focus policies.

Bernard Yen

10 years ago, as India was celebrating their 60th year of independence, I thought it would be a good idea to imagine what Mauritius could or should look like when we celebrate our 50th year of independence in 2018. I wrote an article about it called “A vision of Mauritius in 2018” which was published in some quarters. When I look back at it now, it is somewhat disheartening to find many of those dreams still far from being achieved.

Marjaana Sall

Since taking office in September 2015, I have met with a large number of stakeholders from various sectors. Our discussions have reinforced my first impression that the European Union (EU) is a valued partner in Mauritius. This is a good sign as we discuss the future EU-Mauritius partnership in the framework of the “Post Cotonou negotiations”. As the world faces more complex challenges, notably climate change and peace and security, a key consideration in shaping this future partnership will be to work together towards achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

Dr Chandan K. Jankee

Under its presidency of G20 Summit, Germany, the leading economy in the European Union (EU), is forging a more concrete link with the African continent by advocating a Marshall Plan. In addition to a brief on the different aspects of this Plan, the objective of this article is to highlight the opportunities for Mauritius with this new Africa Strategy.

Gerald Lincoln

The Mauritian economy has experienced reduced growth rates over the past few years, and although a number of sectors have been earmarked to drive growth, only tourism has gained momentum so far. The growth rate in 2017 is unlikely to exceed 3.8% and job creation is a challenge. Brain drain is also becoming more of an issue today, with young Mauritians emigrating at a worrying pace.

Deva Armoogum

As the world is watching in bewilderment, the unfolding of the Trump saga, following in the trail of an equally confusing Brexit vote, here in Mauritius we have after years of dilly-dallying given birth to our second edition of the Code of Corporate Governance. The new version intends to provide flexibility but at the same time is a call to move away from selective compliance to more meaningful governance practices. The private sector, through the voice of Business Mauritius, has pledged to inclusiveness and sustainability. Unconnected as these events may seem, there is a clear thread linking them, and that is the shift of power and responsibility from governments to corporations as regards the burning issue of sustainability of the planet and of human activities.

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